MOTOR ASSISTED SCOOTER LAWS   


 

Presented by your
Independence Police Department
240 Monmouth Street
Independence, Oregon 97351
(503) 838-1214


 

A brief summary of the Scooter Law in Oregon:


[] use is limited to streets posted at 25 mph (ORS 814.518).
[] they are to be driven at a speed of no greater than 15 mph (ORS 814.512).
[] all riders must wear a helmet (ORS 814.534).
[] signaling, such as turns and stopping, are required (ORS 814.522).
[] no passengers allowed (ORS 814.530).
[] drivers must be 16 years-of-age or older (ORS 814.512).
[] use on sidewalks in general is prohibited (ORS 814.524). [] most Pocket Bikes and Mini-Motorcycles are NOT considered motor-assisted scooters (see below)

 
1. What is a Motor Assisted Scooter? (new)

A Motor Assisted Scooter is a vehicle that
1. is designed to be operated on the ground with not more than three wheels
2. has handlebars and a foot support or seat for the operatorís use
3. can be propelled by motor or by human propulsion
4. and is equipped with a power source that can not propel the vehicle at a speed of greater than 24 miles per hour on level ground, and
(a) if the power source is a combustion engine gas, has a piston or rotor displacement od 35 cubic centimeters or less regardless of the number of chambers in the power source; or
(b) if the power source is electric electric, has a power output of not more than 1,000 watts.

NOTE on items not included in the description above:


Most "Mini-Motorcycles" mini chopper or "Pocket Bikes" pocket bike do not fit into the same category as motor-assisted scooters.

If they have a combustion engine over 35cc's and travel faster than 24 miles per hour, they are considered a moped or a motorcycle, which must be titles, registered, and insured to operate on Oregon roads. These vehicles are not manufactured to operate on the roads and are not equipped to meet US DOT safety standards.
Manufacturers of these vehicles do not provide Manufacturers's Certificate of Origin, or standardized 17-digit VIN's.

Unless proof is provided to show these vehicles meet US DOT equipment and safety standards, they cannot be titles and registered, and should not be operated on roads or highways.
These are off-road vehicles only.


 
2. Do I have to obey the same laws as other vehicles?

Yes. An operator of a motor assisted scooter upon a public way is subject to the provisions applicable to, and has the same rights and duties as the operator of, any other vehicle operating on highways. An exception is when those provisions that by their very nature can have no application and when otherwise specifically provided under the vehicle code.
 
3. How old do I have to be to operate a motor assisted scooter?

You must be 16 years of age to operate a motor assisted scooter.
 
4. Are there speed limits that I have to obey?

Yes. It is also unlawful for someone to operate a motor assisted scooter at a rate of speed exceeding 15 miles per hour.
 
5. Do I have to use a bicycle lane or path?

Yes. If you operate a motor assisted scooter on any portion of a roadway that is not a bicycle lane or bicycle path when a bicycle lane or bicycle path is adjacent to or near the roadway then you have committed a violation. However, if a local ordinance prohibits you from operating your motor assisted scooter on a bicycle lane or bicycle path then you are not in violation.
 
6. Can I operate my motor assisted scooter in state parks?

Yes and No. The State Parks and Recreation Department may restrict or prohibit the operation of a motor assisted scooter on a bicycle lane or bicycle path in a state park. However, the department may not restrict or prohibit the operation of a motor assisted scooter on a bicycle lane or bicycle path in a state park if the operator of the motor assisted scooter is disabled.
 
7. What would improper operation of a motor assisted scooter on a highway be?

You may operate a motor assisted scooter on a highway as long as the designated speed limit is no greater than 25 miles per hour, unless you are operating on a bicycle lane or crossing a highway.
 
8. What would improper operation of motor assisted scooter in a lane be?

If the person is operating a motor assisted scooter on a roadway at less than the normal speed of traffic using the roadway at that time and place under the existing conditions and the person does not ride as close as practicable to the right curb or edge of the roadway.
This rule does not apply to the operator under the following circumstances:
  (1) When overtaking and passing another motor assisted scooter or vehicle that is proceeding in the same direction.
  (2) When preparing to execute a left turn.
  (3) When reasonably necessary to avoid hazardous conditions.
  (4) When operating within a city as near as practicable to the left curb or edge of a roadway that is designated to allow traffic to move in only one direction along the roadway.   
  (5) When operating a motor assisted scooter alongside not more than one other motor assisted scooter as long as the motor assisted scooters are both being operated within a single lane and in a manner that does not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic.
  (6) When operating on a bicycle lane or bicycle path.
 
9. Do I have to signal when stopping or turning?

Yes. The operator of a motor assisted scooter must use the appropriate hand and arm signal continuously for at least 100 feet before stopping. The operator must also give the appropriate hand and arm signal for at least 100 feet before executing a turn or lane change. If the operator is stopped and wishes to turn, then while stopped, the operator must use the appropriate hand and arm signal for the turn. An operator is not required to use the appropriate hand and arm signals for stopping, turning or lane change if circumstances require that both hands be used to safely control or operate the motor assisted scooter.
 
10. Can I ride my motor assisted scooter on a sidewalk?

No. An operator cannot operate a motor assister scooter on a sidewalk unless to enter or leave adjacent property. It can be unlawful for an operator to enter or leave adjacent property if the person does any of the following:
   (1) Operates the motor assisted scooter so as to suddenly leave a curb or other place of safety and move into the path of a vehicle that is so close as to constitute an immediate hazard.
  (2) Does not give an audible warning before overtaking and passing a pedestrian or does not yield the right of way to all pedestrians on the sidewalk.
  (3) Operates the motor assisted scooter in a careless manner that endangers or would be likely to endanger any person or property.
  (4) Operates the motor assisted scooter at a speed greater than an ordinary walk when approaching a crosswalk, approaching or entering a driveway or crossing a curb cut or pedestrian ramp and a motor vehicle is approaching the crosswalk, driveway, curb cut or pedestrian ramp.
 
11. Who has the right of way on a bicycle path or lane?

All pedestrians have the right of way on the bicycle path or bicycle lane. The operator of a motor assisted scooter must give an audible warning before overtaking and passing a pedestrian on a bicycle path or bicycle lane.
 
12. Can I ride my motor assisted scooter in a crosswalk?

No. The operator must walk the motor assisted scooter while in a crosswalk, except if the operator is a disabled person.
 
13. How many passengers can the operator of a motor assisted scooter have?    None. The operator of a motor assisted scooter cannot have any other passengers on the scooter while in operation.
 
14. Do I have to have both hands on the handlebars while operator the motor assisted scooter?

No, but it is unlawful for the operator of a motor assisted scooter who carries a package, bundle or article that prevents the person from keeping at least one hand upon the handlebars and having full control at all times.
 
15. Iím an adult. Do I have to wear protective headgear when operator my motor assisted scooter?

Yes. Everyone must wear protective headgear while operating a motor assisted scooter, no matter how old you are.
 
16. Can I get a ticket for allowing my child to operate a motor assisted scooter if theyíre under 16 years of age?

Yes. If you are the parent, legal guardian or person with legal responsibility for the safety and welfare of a child under 16 years of age and authorizes or knowingly permits the child to operate a motor assisted scooter then you may receive a citation. You may also receive a citation for authorizing or knowingly permitting a child under 16 years of age to operate of motor assisted scooter that is not equipped with the proper lighting equipment.
 
17. What king of lighting equipment is required?

While operating a motor assisted scooter on any highway during times of limited visibility conditions the motor assisted scooter must be equipped with, or the person must use, lighting equipment that meets the following requirements:
  (1) If the motor assisted scooter is equipped with lighting equipment then the lighting equipment must include a white light visible from a distance of at least 300 feet to the front and sides. The lighting equipment must have a red reflector or lighting device, or material of such size or characteristic, mounted to be visible from all distances up to 500 feet to the rear when directly in front of lawful lower beams of headlights on a motor vehicle. The lighting equipment must have a white or yellow reflector or lighting device, or material of such size or characteristic, mounted to be visible from all distances up to 200 feet to the front of the motor assisted scooter.
  (2) If the motor assisted scooter is not equipped with lighting equipment, the operator of the motor assisted scooter must wear a white light mounted to be visible from all distances up to 300 feet to the front and sides of the motor assisted scooter. A red reflector or lighting device, or material of such size or characteristic, must be mounted to be visible from all distances up to 500 feet to the rear when directly in front of lawful lower beams of headlights on a motor vehicle. A white or yellow reflector or lighting device, or material of such size or characteristic, must be mounted to be visible from all distances up to 200 feet to the front of the motor assisted scooter.
 
18. Do I need Insurance?

No, insurance is not required.
 
19. Do I have to register my motor assisted scooter?

No, you do not need to register your motor assisted scooter.
 
Definitions 801.305 "Highway."
"Highway" means every public way, road, street, thoroughfare and place, including bridges, viaducts and other structures within the boundaries of this state, open, used or intended for use of the general public for vehicles or vehicular traffic as a matter of right.
 
801.590 "Vehicle."
"Vehicle" means any device in, upon or by which any person or property is or may be transported or drawn upon a public highway and includes vehicles that are propelled or powered by any means.
 
801.155 "Bicycle lane."
"Bicycle lane" means that part of the highway, adjacent to the roadway, designated by official signs or markings for use by persons riding bicycles except as otherwise specifically provided by law.
 
801.160 "Bicycle path."
"Bicycle path" means a public way, not part of a highway, that is designated by official signs or markings for use by persons riding bicycles.
 
801.450 "Roadway."
"Roadway" means the portion of a highway that is improved, designed or ordinarily used for vehicular travel, exclusive of the shoulder.
 
801.325 "Limited visibility condition."
"Limited visibility condition" means: (1) Any time from sunset to sunrise; and (2) Any other time when, due to insufficient light or unfavorable atmospheric conditions, persons and vehicles are not clearly discernible on a straight, level, unlighted highway at a distance of 1,000 feet ahead.
 
815.052 Rules establishing standards for bicycle headgear.
The Department of Transportation shall adopt and enforce rules establishing minimum standards and specifications for safe protective headgear to be worn by people operating bicycles and by passengers on bicycles. The rules shall conform, insofar as practicable, to safety standards and specifications for such headgear issued by the American National Standards Institute, Snell or the United States Department of Transportation.
 
You can find more on Oregon's mini-motorcycle law by visiting this website


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